Background
Srixon Golf has been quite the marketing machine lately, with their little evil golf ball ads, Jim Furyk and Henrik Stenson leading the tour charge..they are certainly making a name for themselves. I was asked to review the Srixon Trispeed golf ball and was thrilled to get my hands on them. I played a few sleeves of the Z-URS balls earlier this year and was pleasantly surprised with the performance.

The all new Srixon Trispeed brings multilayer performance to a broad audience of golfers. The Trispeed features Srixon’s proprietary soft, Energetic Gradient Growth core which provides highly efficient energy transfer from ball to club for a wide range of swing speeds, along with ideal high launch angle and low spin launch conditions. The mid-layer is made of highly resilient Rabalon® HR blended ionomer for enhanced ball speed. The soft Rabalon blended cover delivers an incredible feel with amazing velocity. Core, Mid and Cover – three layers, each designed for the one thing that directly translates to distance – Speed.

The Srixon Trispeed golf ball provides:

  • Greater carry with exceptionally soft feel for players of all swing speeds
  • Highly resilient, advanced aerodynamics for greater carry and distance
  • Superb soft feel on all shots from tee to green
  • High trajectory aerodynamics make it easier to get the ball airborne
Srixon Trispeed Golf Balls

Look
The Trispeed is a pretty common looking golf ball. The Srixon logo is quite understated…no..there isn’t a big grinning smile with big teeth on the side. The alignment aid on the Trispeed is simple, and pretty effective. You may still want to draw your own line down the side. I still prefer the alignment aid on the cheap-o Top-Flite D2 balls, everyone should adopt an alignment aid like that!

Not that it matters much once it’s on the course, but the packaging is quite nice as well. To top it off, I’m not sure if this promotion is still going, but if you head over to your local Golfsmith and buy a dozen Srixon balls you’ll get a pretty sharp looking golf towel for free.

Srixon Golf Balls

Performance and Feel
So, the Trispeed is a low spin, distance ball, essentially. It probably competes with the HX-Hot, NXT, e6 and to a much lesser extent, the Top Flite D2. Having played the D2 (Feel/Distance) and the HX-Hot a lot this summer, I will try to compare the Trispeed performance and feel to those balls.

In the month of July, I posted up a bunch of rounds in the 70s, while playing the D2 Feel and Distance balls (depending on the course/conditions). So I feel as if I have a fair amount of recent experience with those particular balls. Each ball has its merits, but also leaves a little to be desired. I found the Trispeed to be a nice blend of the D2 Distance and Feel. It felt softer than the D2 Soft and seemed to eek out the D2 distance a bit in terms of distance off the tee. A winning combination in my mind. If it had the same price point and the alignment aid, I’d be in ball heaven.

Earlier in the year, I was in love with the Callaway HX Hot. I spent a lot of time working on my 100 yard wedge game with that ball, and grew used to the somewhat harsh feel and lack of spin. I did, however, love how straight it was off the tee, and how far the ball always seemed to go. I never did feel comfortable putting with it though. At some point, I decided the D2 balls were worth a try, and never really looked back to the HX-Hot. Suddenly, the HX-Hot felt very hard compared to the D2 Feel….and well…compared to the Srixon Trispeed, the HX-Hot is a rock.

On the putting green, the Trispeed has decent softness to it. It certainly isn’t the Z-URS or a ProV1, but for a mid priced ball, it is pretty soft. Certainly softer than the HX-Hot or the D2 balls. Same goes for pitches and chips around the green. Hit the Z-URS then the Trispeed, and you will definitely feel the difference…the Z-URS feeling softer and generating more spin. But, you’re also looking at nearly twice the price. Compared to the HX Hot and the D2 balls, I much preferred the Trispeed on and around the greens.

All that being said, unless you’re a consistent ball striker, who keeps the ball very straight off the tee and is precise enough to benefit from a lot of spin around the green, I would stick with the less expensive 3 layer balls (like the Trispeed). You will find your mis hits on the tee fly straighter (the lower spin off the driver) and unless you have perfected your wedge technique, the ball probably won’t spin back any less than the expensive 2 layer balls.

If I had to rank the balls I played the most this summer, and trust me, this is NOT scientific, here would be my list:

Softness/Feel

  • Srixon Trispeed
  • Top Flite D2 Feel
  • Top Flite D2 Distance
  • Callaway HX-Hot

Iron Spin

  • Srixon Trispeed
  • Top-Flite D2 Feel
  • Callaway HX-Hot
  • Top-Flite D2 Distance

Driver Distance

  • HX Hot
  • Srixon Trispeed
  • Top-Flite D2 Distance
  • Top-Flite D2 Feel
Srixon Trispeed Golf Balls

Conclusion
With so many people playing Titleist, Callaway and Top-Flite balls, having a Srixon ball is a welcome change. They are very easy to identify, and you generally do not have to worry about anyone playing your ball by mistake. “Oh, that’s Sean’s ball, it’s the Srixon.” Though, given the performance of this ball, and the Z-UR line of balls, I imagine that may be changing. You’ll also find yourself saying ‘Get yo srix-on’ to yourself quite often.

If you’re looking for a nice combination of straight distance off the tee with your driver, and relatively nice feel off your irons and around the green…without breaking the bank…the Srixon Trispeed may be a great option for you. No your wedge won’t suck the ball back 20 feet like a ZUR-S or ProV1, but, with the right grooves (check out my Eidolon Wedge Review) you should be able to get this ball to check and stop pretty easy. You should be able to find the Srixon Trispeed balls for about $20->$25 a dozen at your local golf shop or perhaps slightly less on ebay. Similar in price to that of the Titliest NXT, the Callaway HX-Hot and Bridgestone e6.

Now, I need to get my hands on a set of Srixon i-701 irons!

Comments
Harvey Specter
Posted at 8:28 am October 24, 2007
bergycb
Author

I normally use either the Srixon ZURS or ZUR; the ZURC spins too much for me. I love the NXT Tour in cooler weather. Can you make a comparison of Trispeed vs NXT Tour in terms of overall performance? Thanks for the very informative article above.
Bergy

Harvey Specter
Posted at 8:35 am October 24, 2007
DeepRough
Author

Bergy,

I haven’t played the 2007 NXT Tour, but given the similar price point, I would assume you could expect similar performance. I’ll have to see if I can get my hands on some of the 2007 NXT Tours, as well as some others, and have a little ‘ball shootout’.

Right now I’m playing with the TaylorMade TP Reds, and for the price (found some for $23/dozen), they are quite a steal as well.

Harvey Specter
Posted at 11:29 am October 24, 2007
bergycp
Author

Pls let me know how TP Reds compare to Trispeeds (distance, softness, spin). Do you know roughly what compression TP Reds are? I’m going to buy a dozen Trispeeds today, I want to see if they’re an even better cold-weather ball than NXT Tour. Thanks again.

Harvey Specter
Posted at 11:50 am October 24, 2007
DeepRough
Author

The TM TP balls are more online with the ZURS/ZURC…the TP Red playing more like the ZURS..and the TP Black playing more like the ZURC

Here’s is a nice detailed review of the TM TP balls compared to the ProV1/X. They list the technical specs of the balls reviewed.

Harvey Specter
Posted at 2:01 pm October 24, 2007
bergycp
Author

Thanks, I like technical articles like those found at The Sand Trap and your site; they’re not that easy to find. I wish ball companies provided more specs on their products. I swing my driver about 110 mph but am rather steep so ball compression and cover firmness are very critical for me. I don’t have time to try every ball out there. Do you know of anyone who has published in depth data on the compression and cover shore hardness of the most popular balls? I found one web site sells a 20 page book on this but I don’t know if I want to put my credit card # on thier site and don’t really want to pay $20 for data that I’m not certain I can trust. Plus as far as I can tell they get distance and spin #’s from just one swing speed which probably isn’t that relevent for my swing.

Harvey Specter
Posted at 2:04 pm October 24, 2007
DeepRough
Author

If you don’t have the time/patience to go testing every ball out there, perhaps you could find a local pro/driving range that will do a ball fitting for you? Hit a variety of balls on a trackman/some other launch monitor, and get some solid numbers based on your swing/equipment.

Harvey Specter
Posted at 2:46 pm October 24, 2007
bergycb
Author

I did that although the fitting was more focused on the new driver and 3wood I got. The guy (who was really good in terms of fitting the clubs) just looked at my swing data and said I definitely need the ProV1X. Problem is I don’t like the V1X that much. I wound up going with ZUR over Cal HX but now I think Srixon is discontinuing ZUR in favor of ZURC (which I don’t like). Will take a look at Bridgestone and Taylor Made firm balls. I also like some of the lower compression balls like NXT Tour except that I get fliers every once in a while from the fairways so struggle with distance control; as I said will also try the Trispeed as I think Srixon does a great job in general.

Harvey Specter
Posted at 8:18 pm March 16, 2008
keller
Author

my golf in instructor gave me a set of srixon ball to practice with. I’ve only used srixon range ball and I think they are pretty good for a ball, and good for a range ball. But I hope these balls that he gave me suits me well.

Harvey Specter
Posted at 12:07 pm April 2, 2009
Mike Dennis
Author

Soft feel balls
1) Nike Power/Distant Soft
2)Srixon Trispeed
3) Top Flite D2 Feel
Look at www,golfballselector.com for further info on which ball suits your swing.
I found the above article very informative and interesting. Well done.

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